Thai Language Grammar: Using “same”

In Thai, we have several words meaning “the same” or “the same as”, which one to use depends on the context. Let’s look at them here…..

1. Adjective: meuan-gan (เหมือนกัน)

When we want to say that two or more things are exactly like one another, we use “meuan-gan” (เหมือนกัน), which literally means “same each other”. It is used for indicating that a particular person, thing, or way of doing something is exactly “the same” or identical with another person, thing, or way of doing something that is about to be or has just been mentioned.

Observe the following examples below:

– kao gin aa-haan-chao meuan-gan tuk wan
(The eats the same breakfast every day)
– khun ao sa-dtaek reuh? chan ja ao meuan-gan, dtae mai suk maak
(You’re having steak? I will have the same, but very rare)
– roob-phaab thang sawng roob doo meuan gan sam-rap chan
(The two pictures look the same to me)
– Kevin beua ngaai maak. phaw kawng-kao gaw meuan gan
(Kevin gets bored very easily. His dad is just the same)
– seua-jacket lae gaang-gaaeng see geuab meuan-gan
(The jacket and trousers are almost the same colour)

We often used “meuan-gan” (เหมือนกัน) with the preposition “gap” (กับ): “meuan-gan gap” (เหมือนกันกับ) to say that someone or something is “the same as” someone or something else. However, it is often shortened to “meuan gap” (เหมือนกับ).

Observe the following examples below:

– man meuan(-gan) gap dtawn phuak-rao bpai Europe
(It’s the same as when we go to Europe)
– mae kawng-chan mee rot meuan(-gan) gap phaw kawng-chan
(My mother has the same car as my father)
– ter sai choo-gra-bpong meuan(-gan) gap thee chan sai
(She was wearing the same dress as I was)
– John kid meuan(-gan) gap thee phom kid – man phaeng maak geun bpai
(John thinks the same as I do – it’s far too expensive)
– kon mak-ja phood waa phom doo meuan(-gan) gap phee-sao kawng-phom
(People usually say that I look the same as my older sister)

2. Adjective: dio-gan (เดียวกัน)

We use “dio-gan” (เดียวกัน) when a particular person or thing is the one of the same person or thing that we are referring to and not a different one. In other word, “dio-gan” (เดียวกัน) means “the same” one and not another different thing, person or situation.

It is normally used with classifier referring to the noun being mentioned: noun + classifier + dio-gan. However, the classifier can often be omitted if the noun referring and the classifier are the same words or, if the context is clear without stating the classifier.

Observe the following examples below:

– Jane lae Tom phood pha-sa (pha-sa) dio-gan
(Jane and Tom speak the same language)
– phuak-rao seu-kawng thee (thee) dio-gan sa-meur
(We always shop at the same places)
– faen kawng-chan lae chan tham-ngaan thee baw-ree-sart (thee) dio-gan
(My boyfriend and I work at the same company)
– nawng-chai kawng-phom lae phom nawn nai hawng (hawng) dio-gan
(My younger brother and I sleep in the same room)
– phuak-kao gin-kaao thee raan-aa-haan (thee) dio-gan tuk aa-thid
(They eat at the same restaurant every week)
– khun gin aa-haan (yaang) dio-gan tuk krang thee phuak-rao ma thee-nee
(You have the same food every time we come here)

We also used “dio-gan” (เดียวกัน) with the preposition “gap” (กับ): “dio-gan gap” (เดียวกันกับ) to say that a particular person or thing being referred to is the one of “the same as” person or thing previously mentioned or known. It is often shortened to “dio gap” (เดียวกับ).

Observe the following examples below:

– phom mee bpan-haa (yaang) dio(-gan) gap khun
(I have the same problem as you)
– phom geud wan dio(-gan) gap wan thee phaw kawng-phom sia-chee-wid
(I was born on the same day that my father died)
– phuak-rao phag yoo thee rong-raem dio(-gan) gap phaw-mae kawng-phuak-rao
(We were staying at the same hotel as our parents)
– aa-wud chai nai garn-kaa-dta-gam bpen aa-wud (an) dio(-gan) gap an thee keuy chai ma gaawn
(The weapon used in the murder was the same as the one used before)
– aa-haan (yaang) dio(-gan) gap thee maw nae-nam bpen thee ni-yom yaang-noy gap phuak-dek-dek
(The same foods as the ones that doctors recommend are the least popular with children)

3. Adjective: thao-gan (เท่ากัน)

We use “thao-gan” (เท่ากัน) when we want to say that one number, amount, price, size, shape, value, or importance is equal to another. Like other words meaning “same”, “thao-gan” (เท่ากัน) is also used with the preposition “gap” (กับ): “thao-gan gap” (เท่ากันกับ) to express “the same as”; and it is often shortened to “thao gap” (เท่ากับ)

Observe the following examples below:

– phuak-rao tham-ngaan duay kwaam-reo thao-gan
(We work at the same speed)
– see daan kawng see-liam mee kwaam-yaaow thao-gan thang-mud
(The four sides of a square are all the same length)
– tuk kon thao-thiam-gan, som-kuan dai rap sid thao-gan lae gan
(All people are equal, deserving the same rights as each other)
– Jane aa-yoot thao(-gan) gap chan
(Jane is the same age as me)
– luuk-chai kawng-ter aa-yoot thao(-gan gap) kawng-chan
(Her son is the same as mine)
– condo neung hawng-nawn thee London ra-ka geuab thao(-gan) gap baan haa hawng-nawn thee Liverpool
(A one-bedroom flat in London costs almost the same as a five-bedroom house in Liverpool)

4. Adjective: deuhm (เดิม)

We used “deuhm” (เดิม) when we want to say that someone or something has not changed or remains “the same” as it was before.

The appropriate classifier referring to the noun being mentioned is used with “deuhm” (เดิม): noun + classifier + deuhm when a particular person or thing is the one of the same person or thing that we are referring to and not a different one as before.
However, the classifier can be omitted when the noun and the classifier are the same words or, if the context is clear without stating the classifier.

Observe the following examples below:

– Jane yang kap rot (kan) deuhm
(Jane still drives the same car)
– chan mai ao an nee, chan ao an deuhm
(I don’t want this one, I want the same one as before)
– Tom yang aa-sai yoo thee baan (lang) deuhm
(Tom still lives in the same house)
– phuak-rao phob gan way-laa (way-laa) deuhm phrung-nee dee mai?
(Shall we meet up at the same time tomorrow?)
– phuak-rao ja phob gan eek aa-thid naa, way-laa (way-laa) deuhm, thee (thee) deuhm
(We will meet again next week, same time, same place)

The word “meuan” (เหมือน) is used with “deuhm” (เดิม): “meuan-deuhm” (เหมือนเดิม) when someone, something or situation is still “the same” as it was before.

Observe the following examples below:

– Jane yang meuan-deuhm sa-meur
(Jane is still the same as always)
– phom ao aa-haan meuan-deuhm gap wan eun-eun
(I want the same food as any other day)
– na-yo-baai kawng rat-tha-baan yang meuan-deuhm dtang-dtae bpee 1991
(The Government’s policy has remained the same since 1991)
– chon-na-bod doo geuab meuan-deuhm gap thee bpen ma 200 bpee thee-laeo
(The countryside looks much the same as it did 200 years ago)

The word “thao” (เท่า) is used with “deuhm” (เดิม): “thao-deuhm” (เท่าเดิม) when the amount, price, size, shape, value, or importance is still equal to or “the same” as another as it has always been, or just as much as before.

Observe the following examples below:

– ra-ka yang thao-deuhm
(The price still the same)
– kao yang doo aa-yoot thao-deuhm
(He still looks the same age)
– chan ao naam-kaeng thao-deuhm gap wan eun-eun
(I want the same amount of ice as any other day)
– lang jaak phuak-rao dtaeng-ngaan gan ma 30 bpee, phom yang rak phan-ra-yaa kawng-phom thao-deuhm
(After 30 years of marriage, I still love my wife the same)

5. Phrase: chen gan (เช่นกัน)

When we agree with what has been said or we have experienced the same thing as someone else has, the phrase “chen gan” (เช่นกัน) is used. It is literally means “like each other” and it is equivalent to the phrase “same here” in the English language.

Observe the following examples below:

– “phom dai raw-koy thee ja phob khun” “chen gan””
(“I’ve been looking forward to meeting you.” “Same here“)
– phom kid waa phaab-pha-yon reuang nan yaae maak” “chen gan”)
(“I thought that film was awful!” “Same here!“)

The phrase “chen gan” (เช่นกัน) can also be used as an answer to someone who has greeted or insulted you in order to wish the same thing to them. It is equivalent to the phrase “Same to you” in the English language. However, in this context, the phrase “chen gan” (เช่นกัน) tend to be used with a polite particle “na” (นะ): “chen gan na” (เช่นกันนะ)

Observe the following examples below:

– “bpai thio hai sa-nuk na!” “chan gan na!”
(“Have a good holiday!” “Same to you!“)
– “mee wan-yud sao-aa-thid thee dee na!” “chen gan na!”
(“Have a good weekend!” “Same to you.“)
– “khun bpen kon kee-phae” “chai, chen gan na!”
(“You’re a loser.” “Yeah, same to you!“)